Enjoy your summer!

Preventing Summer Slide

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Studies show that children who do not read or have access to books during the summer lose up to two months of reading performance. Those losses accumulate during the elementary school years so that by the time a child enters middle school he/she may be two and a half years behind! All children, whether from low, middle or upper income families, may fall victim to the “summer slide” if not provided with summer reading opportunities. So how do we prevent the summer slide or even hope to accelerate reading growth? Here are a few ideas:

Visit your local library: Help your child find “good fit” books. Good fit books are books that are of high interest to your child and are not beyond their reading level. You can use the five finger test to determine if the book is too difficult for your child. Open the book to a page with many words. Have your child begin reading the text. Hold up a finger for each word he/she does not know. If you have four or five fingers up, the text may be too difficult for your child to read independently. Feel free to still check out the book! It just may be a book you want to read with your child.

Be sure your child reads at least 20 minutes a day: According to research, a child who reads only one minute a day outside of school will learn 8,000 words by the end of sixth grade where a student who reads 20 minutes outside of school will learn 1,800,000 words. If reading isn’t one of your child’s top priorities, you may need to set up an incentive program.

Set a good example: When your child sees you reading and enjoying a book or a newspaper article, you are sending a message that reading is important and valuable. Read to your child. When you read to your child, he/she hears the rhythm of language. Be sure to read with expression. Changing your voice for different characters and increasing your volume during exciting parts are only a few ways to keep children engaged.

Read with your child: Explore different types of reading such as poetry. For our little ones, poetry is a great way to improve phonemic awareness skills as poetry often incorporates

rhyme. For our older children, poetry is a means of improving fluency. Read for different purposes. Reading directions for a recipe or directions for assembling a toy

are fun ways of incorporating reading into everyday activities.

Play games with words: A commercial game such as Apples to Apples improves vocabulary. You can easily turn a game of hopscotch or 4-square into a game that incorporates learning letters or sight words.

Have a happy and healthy summer! Be sure to read, read and read some more. Not only can we prevent the summer slide, we can accelerate reading growth.

10 Social Manners for Children

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As we raise kids in this digital age, it seems as though manners can fall by the wayside. Here is a helpful list that can help serve as a reminder of what manners might be most important as children grow up. 

  1. Say “Please” when asking
  2. Say “Thank you” when receiving
  3. Say “Excuse me” after bumping into someone
  4. Put down your electronics when someone enters the room
  5. Look people in the eye when speaking
  6. Let others finish before you speak
  7. Shake hands firmly
  8. Say “Yes Ma’am and Yes Sir” when talking to grownups
  9. Greet people with “Hi” and “How are you?”
  10. Open Doors for others

10 Great Summer Read Alouds

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Reading out loud to your child can not only be a great way to bond, but it can be a great way for your child to learn to read or hold on to those skills they learned this past year and avoid the summer slide. Here are some great books that your child might enjoy. 

  1. Holes By Louis Sachar (Ages 10+)
  2. Charlotte’s Web By E. B. White (Ages 8+)
  3. The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett (Ages 7+)
  4. James and the Giant Peach By Roald Dahl (Ages 6+)
  5. The Giver By Lois Lowry (Ages 10+)
  6. The Harry Potter Series (Ages 9+)
  7. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory By Roald Dahl (Ages 8+)
  8. Because of Winn-Dixie By Kate DiCamillo (Ages 8+)
  9. The Boxcar Children By Gertrude Chandler Warner (Ages 6+)
  10. Where the Sidewalk Ends By Shel Silverstein (Ages 4+)

Graduation

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It has been an amazing year and an amazing journey for our seniors at Crothersville. They have put in years of hard work, and as a result, their futures are coming together before their eyes. Some have been accepted to colleges across the country, some are pursuing a specific vocation while others are taking advantage of community college.

We will come together as a community to celebrate these students’ accomplishments together at our annual graduation ceremony on May 20, 2022, at 8 p.m. 

Crothersville Offers Dual Credit

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Our classrooms and facilities offer contemporary learning environments enriched by the latest technology. Attend Crothersville and have the opportunity to save up to $40,000 in college tuition through our early college program at Crothersville High School. Contact us. We’d love to have you as part of Crothersville Community Schools.

Get Ready for Summer

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Reading with your child is one of the greatest gifts you can give them. Here are some titles that might be fun to read over the summer. 

  • Matilda, by Roald Dahl
  • The One and Only Ivan, by Katherin Applegate
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, by Roald Dahl
  • The Book with No Pictures, by B.J. Novak
  • A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L’Engle
  • My Father’s Dragon, by Ruth Stiles Gannett
  • Where the Wild Things Are, by Maurice Sendak
  • The Hundred Dresses, by Eleanor Estes
  • Holes, by Louis Sachar
  • The Boxcar Children, by Gertrude C. Warner
  • Wonder, by R.J. Palacio
  • Because of Winn-Dixie, by Kate DiCamillo
  • Frindle, by Andrew Clements

A Growth Mindset

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Some children are born with an inner drive to keep trying over and over when they fail. Most children aren’t, though, and it is up to us to help them see that failing is actually the key to succeeding. Teaching our children the word YET is key. They may come to you and say, “I don’t know how to read” or “I can’t ride a 2-wheeler” or “I can’t get good grades.” We need to teach them to add the word “yet” to the end of those sentences so they start to realize that these things take time and with the right mindset, they will happen! 

Sit down with your child and list out things that they now do that at one time they thought were hard. Have them tell you that with practice they learned to do hard things. They are able to do hard things! Using this type of thinking and dialogue around our children will teach them that by trying, failing and learning from their mistakes, they will succeed at doing hard things.